Star Wars: The Clone Wars – Series Finale Review

Series Finale
Reading Time ~ 3 minutes

 

Clone Wars’ return to screen has always been the most anticipated adaptation of Star Wars and it’s quite fair to claim that. Even after Disney’s takeover of Star Wars, their two CGI animation attempts weren’t as respected or even as full. It’s apparent that Disney’s ability to do right for its franchises, having to compete with their former glories when it comes to their cartoons. Avengers Assemble would never be an Earth’s Mightest Heroes as Ultimate Spider-Man would never eclipse Spectacular Spider-Man or 90s Fox Spider-Man’s fame. Disney greenlit the 7th chapter of Clone Wars, which gave the series the 12 episodes to end the exploits. And how.

Ashoka is pulled back, into the War of the Republic, through the need of the Mandalorian people. After her misadventures with the pirate sisters, she is whisked away back into the war that was alongside the Jedi. With the Clone Troopers all at the ready to run her play to oust Darth Maul and his indoctrinated coups out of Mandalore, there is a promise of justice. Yet, how far will this be able to go until events foreseen in other chapters, will intertwine?

This run constantly references the prequel, creating the bridge it needs. From Attack of The Clones to Revenge of the Sith. The retconning of events, even the references given by other characters, fill the holes well. Sure, Ashoka isn’t referenced there, but her journey that returns her to Skywalker and departing him, is seamless. The use of Star Wars’ collective voices trick, similar to Rise of Skywalker’s thing, was quite the touch. The betrayal trigger cut deep, especially through sombre moments. The refining trust of Ashoka broken again by a puppetmaster, yet the short truce between her and Maul to escape. The tug of war, even with Rex’s, was a surprise. Each overtaking of the cruiser was unexpected. We get a few standstill moments.

Star Wars The Clone Wars

Everything leading up to the end is near perfect as Tano is pushed to the path climbing up to Maul. How Darth Maul and Ashoka’s final climactic duel was could possibly be the most satisfying and intense moments of the series. Ray Park returns to mocap our red and black Sith lord to be who overtakes Mandalore. That glass break for the Mandalore fight was perfection. Of course, this was no climax, but to see a Jedi battle, within this exploit was needed. Seeing how her story plays out was arguably the best for the character. Ashoka’s conflicting views with the home she knew since she was youngling, is quite relatable to Anakin’s, yet her path was not as straightforward or even predictable. It runs through a more open-ended run.

We get several amazing points. The reunion to Skywalker. The painting of the guard helms. Even Ashoka’s new toys were well received. The ending alone throws a few more questions to the totality of Clone Wars, but nothing farfetched. Especially the wrap-up. We even get a glimpse of what could be the prequel to Rebels we could ever hope for. Clone Wars is the quite the patchwork that any Star Wars fiend could muster hope for.

 

Final Words:

Star Wars: Clone Wars is bittersweet. In one part, Clone Wars has given us some of its best moments in the series since Savage Oppress, but at the same time: it is it’s last. As does every member of the character roster deserves the shine it gets, it was high time Ashoka took her place in the chapters missed from her introduction to her stoic Rebels near sage appearance. Clone Wars got a second wind and hit it out of the park without any supervision from Disney’s previous cartoon goes. Clone Wars has often been hailed as one of the best things to come out of the franchise. To match what was brought on in Season 7’s send-off may never be matched this galaxy. Perhaps a couple more shots at goal years far, far away.

 

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